Pods for the homeless in Portland

Immigration and 45 – This Week Better: Jan 29, 2017

City Issues & Ideas, Take Action

We’re one week into 45’s administration and a lot has happened. I will now be referring to Trump as 45. For all the people during the campaign who said they take him seriously, but not literally – I hope you’re awake now. Track Trump is a new site that tracks what 45’s promise was for his first 100 days against what’s really happening. This is a useful “at a glance” list. However, I would recommend two improvements. 1. The green, yellow, red method of done/not done, easily lends itself to a “green = good” or green = complete. I believe that most of the things on this list aren’t good for the American people, and a lot of the items can’t just be “done” by an executive order by the President. The list should also state the channel or department it has to be approved by or the legality and enforceability of any of these Executive Orders. It’s been a long week.

What I’m reading this week:

Anne Frank and her family were also denied entry as refugees to the US  – Anne Frank would have been 87 this year. Her father applied for visas to the US. Frank wrote on April 30, 1941, “Perhaps you remember that we have two girls. It is for the sake of the children mainly that we have to care for. Our own fate is of less importance.” Anne, her sister Margot, and mother all died in concentration camps. Holocaust Remembrance Day was this week. I believe Anne Frank would have continued to write and advocate for more empathy and kindness in immigration policy. –via Washington Post

DO: The majority of American’s don’t agree with 45’s new Executive Order on Immigration that bans refugees and even green card and visa holders from seven Muslim countries from entering the US. Get vocal about this. Donate your time or money (ACLU and IRC are two organizations leading this fight.).


“Sanctuary city” means Portland will remain welcoming to all
– Our new mayor Ted Wheeler (along with many other cities and states around the nation) has taken a stand against 45’s EO about cutting funding to sanctuary cities if they don’t comply. Here are a few highlights if you’re unfamiliar with what this is all about:

  • much like it is the responsibility of the Internal Revenue Service to enforce federal tax policy. Immigration enforcement is a federal responsibility. (ie. your local police aren’t going to come after you because you owe back taxes)
  • “Oregon state law dating back to 1987 prohibits state and local police from enforcing federal immigration law if a person is not involved in criminal activity.”
  • Residents, regardless of immigration status, should not be afraid go to the police with information on crimes for fear that they might be deported. They should not be afraid to access critical services or seek refuge from domestic abuse and homeless services. They should not be afraid to bring their children to school. –via Oregon Live

DO: Oregon is fairly insulated already by our leaders taking a stand. It remains to be seen how this particular issue will impact us later. The easiest way to keep up on what’s happening on these issues is to follow your local leaders on social (Twitter or Facebook). Here’s my Twitter list of local leaders.

How to Culture Jam a Populist in Four “Easy” Steps – Quick read by a Venezuelan comparing 45 to Hugo Chavez and their mastery of Populism. The Advice:

  1. Don’t forget who the enemy is. You. “Populism can only survive amid polarization. It works through caricature, through the unending vilification of a cartoonish enemy. Pro tip: you’re the enemy.”
    2. Show no contempt. Don’t feed polarization, disarm it.
    3. Don’t try to force him out. “A hissy-fit is not a strategy. The people on the other side, and crucially Independents, will rebel against you if you look like you’re losing your mind. All non-democratic channels are counter-productive: you lower your message, and give the Populist rhetorical fuel.”
    4. Find a counter-argument. “the problem is not the message but the messenger. It’s not that Trump supporters are too stupid to see right from wrong, it’s that you’re much more valuable to them as an enemy than as a compatriot. The problem is tribal. Your challenge is to prove that you belong in the same tribe as them: that you are American in exactly the same way they are.” –via Caracas Chronicles

These ‘Sleeping Pods’ Provide Safety and Warmth for Portland’s Homeless – Jumping on the tiny home craze, architects in partnership with PSU students have designed a bunch of tiny home sleeping “pods” that will be used in a pod village in Kenton. The village will be for women. “An estimated 3,800 people in Multnomah County are houseless, according to a 2015 report by the city, and of that population, 49 percent sleep unsheltered every night.” –via Portland Monthly

This Week’s Actions: This week, I sent a few emails to my Senators and House rep about issues that are important to me (Oregon reps are very vocal about where they stand and I don’t need to tie up their phones to tell them I agree), read and researched more about how executive orders impact us, donated to IRC to help their work with Syrian refugees, and started re-reading Don’t Think of an Elephant.

“Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

–Emma Lazarus

Climate Action Plan - Portland 2050 Vision

Climate Action & Legacy: This Week Better – Dec 4, 2016

Climate, Land Use, Take Action

This week was my final Traffic & Transportation class at PSU. It’s been super inspiring to learn from regional transportation professionals through the weekly lectures, and to see what interests fellow Portlanders to make positive changes in our communities. Over the next quarter, I plan to keep up a weekly “class night” to work on projects and learn.

What I’m reading this week:

Obama Reckons with a Trump Presidency: Inside a stunned White House, the President considers his legacy and America’s future. – This one is a long read, but worth the time. Some quotes I enjoyed: “Ideally, in a democracy, everybody would agree that climate change is the consequence of man-made behavior, because that’s what ninety-nine per cent of scientists tell us,” he said. “And then we would have a debate about how to fix it. That’s how, in the seventies, eighties, and nineties, you had Republicans supporting the Clean Air Act and you had a market-based fix for acid rain rather than a command-and-control approach. So you’d argue about means, but there was a baseline of facts that we could all work off of. And now we just don’t have that.”

“The thing that I have always been convinced of,” he said, “the running thread through my career, has been this notion that when ordinary people get engaged, pay attention, learn about the forces that affect their lives and are able to join up with others, good stuff happens.” –via The New Yorker

DO: In the words of our President… Get engaged. Pay attention. Learn about the forces that affect your life. Join up with other. Good stuff will happen.


ODOT wins $28 million federal grant for Historic Highway project
 – Great news for Oregon. The Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail project just won a $28 million grant from the US Department of Transportation for the Mitchell Point Crossing. –via Bike Portland

Does rent control work? Evidence from Berlin – It’s been a year since Berlin enacted a cap on rent increases on existing rentals (based on age, size, # of floors and amenities etc) with modest increases over time. New construction and apartments that are substantially renovated are exempt from the rent control limits. “While posed as a way of promoting affordability for low income households, in practice, rent control may actually provide greater benefits for higher income renters. High income renters may be more savvy in dealing with landlords and exercising their rights, and less subject to the economic dislocations that force low income households to move from rent controlled apartments. Over time, having acquired the “right” to live in a rent controlled apartment, some better off households may choose not to move, or to buy a home, with the result being a lower rate of turnover in apartments: further restricting the supply of housing.” –via City Observatory

DO: Housing affordability is a really complex issue. I’m trying to learn about the different sides and the cause and effect of what some policy changes might do here in Portland.

 
Mayors Set a Tight Deadline to Initiate Climate Action – “The C40 plan calls for member cities to reduce the average emission per person from 5 metric tons to 2.9 by 2030. That reduction will largely come through city-wide “climate actions,” which include things like installing bike lanes and retrofitting buildings with clean energy sources. Collectively, cities have taken 11,000 actions like these so far. By 2020, they’ll need 14,000 more, and roughly three-quarters of that must come from wealthy, high carbon-emitting cities located mostly in the global north.” “Mayors, state, and subnational governments are in a stronger position to deliver on their promises than national governments.” –via City Lab

DO: Portland is an “Innovator City” in the C40. Portland has a Climate Action Plan hidden in the depths of despair that is the Portlandoregon.gov website. Here’s a link to the full pdf The “At a Glance” section is 26 pages in. “This Climate Action Plan identifies twenty 2030 objectives and more than one hundred actions to be completed or significantly underway in the next five years.”

This Week’s Actions: This week, I attended my final Traffic and Transportation Class at PSU, donated to a local environmental nonprofit through GiveGuide!, and stayed off Facebook (25 days now!).

What are you reading and doing this week?

What do we do now? This Week Better – Nov 20, 2016

Take Action, Transportation

Week two. Did you know that the average person spends 50 minutes per day on Facebook (and Instagram)? We spend more time on Facebook per day, than we do reading (19 min), exercising (17 min), and at social events (4 min) combined. Source

That’s almost 6 hours per week of scrolling and tapping through our friends’ lives. As you can see, I’m having a bit of a love/hate relationship with social media this month. I tried to spend more of those six hours doing something – learning, creating, participating, but I also probably spent too long on Twitter. Ha!

What I’m reading this week:

Guerrilla Bike Lanes: San Francisco Makes Illicit Infrastructure Permanent – good reminder that sometimes just taking action gets results from your city. The video at the end will make you grin. –via 99% Invisible

DO: We actually have a lot more power than we sometimes think. Know of a bike lane or pedestrian area that is a safety concern or needs work? Be vocal. Let the city know. Here’s PBOT’s Traffic/Safety reporting form.


In election aftermath, Blumenauer resolute on transportation agenda
– here’s a great interview with Earl Blumenauer, our congressman on his current agenda and the future of “livable communities”. “If we can connect with people on things that matter to them and we can engage activists and advocates, than people can be persuaded to support the things we care about.” –via Bike Portland

DO: Have a conversation with someone about what matters to them from a transportation perspective.


Leaving Women out of Donald Trump’s Cabinet is Not Just Wrong It’s Dangerous
 – Justin Trudeau, Canada’s new prime minister, appointed a 50:50 ratio of male and female to his cabinet. Obama’s was 35% female. Trump’s is currently projected to be less than 10%, the lowest representation since the 1970s. “Group problem-solving abilities significantly improved for mixed-sex groups compared with all-male groups. Duke University researchers similarly found that women reacted to decision-making under stress by making safer, surer decisions, while men reacted by making riskier, go-for-the-big-win choices.” –via Newsweek

DO: Trump’s transition website is asking for you to “Share your ideas” (red link at the bottom of the page). Tell him you want more women and people of color represented in cabinet positions.

Oregon side-note on the above article: On the state and county level my current representatives are 43% female. On the city level, it will be 40% for the new year (city council will be an even split male/female and mayor is male). But, only one person of color, so 8%. Not sure how those stats look on a state level, but that’s the breakdown for my districts living in North Portland.

John Oliver Quote

John Oliver: How did we get to this point? And what do we do now? – “It is going to be too easy for things to start feeling normal, especially if you are someone who is not directly impacted by his actions. Keep reminding yourself ‘THIS IS NOT NORMAL’. 2016 has been the fucking worst”. –via John Oliver

DO: As John Oliver said, donate if you can: Planned Parenthood, Center for Reproductive Rights, NRDC.org, International Refugee Assistance Project – Refugeerights.org, NAACPLDF.org, thetrevorproject.org, maldef.org will all need help. Give money in the name of your relatives! Support actual journalism: propublica.org etc. Here’s a website that’s cataloging them.


Resist: How Donald Trump Threatens Portland—and Why You Must Fight Back 
– A look at how Portland and Oregon could be impacted in 2017 and beyond with Trump as president and very different national policy decisions. It’s a good start at looking at potential threats and what we can do on a local level. –via Willamette Week 

DO: Read through the list of possible predictions and identify your top 1-2 fears or concerns. How can you help?

 

This Week’s Actions: This week, I donated to a local cause through Give!Guide, shared what I’m working on with a few people, went to my Traffic and Transportation class at PSU, presented my project to the class (I’ll post about it soon), stayed off Facebook (12 days now!), I’m using Twitter to share my thoughts and @-ing political representatives, I also followed all my local reps so I can easily see what they’re putting out on social, and followed a dozen people that are different than me to see a different perspective.

“Good ideas don’t matter if people don’t hear them.” –President Obama

What are you reading and doing this week?

Registered Voters that Cast Ballot Portland

Let’s Make This Week Better – Nov 13, 2016

Land Use, Parks & Open Spaces, Take Action, Transportation

Welcome. It’s been a rough week. Better Portland is a new project. I want to document what I’m learning as I try to help make our city a better place. The goal for myself is less news and social media consumption “faux action/outrage”, more listening, more action. Here goes…

What I’m reading this week:

A Tax Credit for Renters – “Our tax code is highly skewed towards homeownership. Between the deductions for mortgage interest expenses and property taxes, the exclusion of capital gains on sales of homes, and the non-taxation of the imputed rent of owner-occupied homes, the federal government spends the equivalent of about $250 billion per year supporting home ownership.” Three ideas from the Terner Center:

  1. “rental affordability” plan: households with incomes of less than 80 percent of the median a tax credit equal to the difference between 30 percent of their household income and the lesser of the actual rent they paid or the small area fair market rent for their neighborhood. The average participant would get assistance of about $474 per month.
  2. “rent reduction” plan – give households a sliding credit of between 12 and 25 percent of their rental payments. This plan would provide less relief—average benefits would be about $227 per household.
  3. combo approach – providing more generous voucher-like benefits for the 3 million lowest income households, and a variant of the rent reduction plan for all other eligible households. –via City Observatory

DO: Share the article, share with our mayor-elect Ted Wheeler (ted@tedwheeler.com) or Tweet him. Not sure yet how we can help support Terner Center for this proposal.


St. Johns fatality fuels fire of neighborhood’s safe streets activism
– Tired of freight trucks and reckless driving holding their streets hostage, on Monday the St. Johns Neighborhood Association will host a forum to delve deeper into the issues of traffic and transportation safety. —via Bike Portland

DO: Attend the St John’s neighborhood forum on Monday, November 14 at 7:30pm.

Who Votes for Mayor – In the last May election, in Portland, 59.4% of eligible voters voted. This is really high turnout compared to most cities (average is below 15%)!? Interestingly, in Portland, 88.4% of registered voters over the age of 65 voted, as compared to 56.7% of registered voters aged 18 to 34.

DO: Talk with friends and family about voting. Don’t shame. Listen. How can we help more people vote?

Hillary Clinton’s Concession Speech – “This loss hurts, but please never stop believing that fighting for what’s right is worth it.” “My friends, let us have faith in each other, let us not grow weary and lose heart, for there are more seasons to come and there is more work to do.” –full transcript on Vox

DO: What work can we do to make sure the next four years are not a total loss?

Voters renew Metro parks and natural areas levy (Measure 26-178) – greater Portland metro region approved a renewal of Metro’s parks and natural areas levy. The renewal is projected to raise about $81 million over the course of five years (through 2023). About half of the money will go toward restoring and maintaining natural areas to improve water quality and fish and wildlife habitat. About 20 to 30 percent will go toward regional parks operations. The rest will go toward improving parks and natural areas for people, grants for community nature projects, and nature education and volunteer programs. The levy costs 9.6 cents per $1,000 in assessed home value. —via Metro

DO: Voted. If you’re a renter, this was free for you. If you’re a homeowner, this was on average $38 per year, or $3 a month or 75 cents a week (based on median assessed value of $395k).

Portland Voters Pass Affordable Housing Measure (Measure 26-179) – Portland voters have passed a $258 million housing bond that will raise property taxes to fund 1,300 units of affordable housing. The bond will go toward alleviating the city’s current shortage of 23,845 affordable units, as determined by the Portland Housing Bureau. The bond will raise property taxes 42 cents per $1,000 of assessed value. A home with Portland’s median home value of $394,800 will pay about $190 more in annual property taxes. Only 950 of the 1,300 units funded by Measure 26-179 will be newly constructed. The other 350 will be acquired by the city from existing private sector stock and preserved as affordable housing. —via OPB

DO: Voted. If you’re a renter, this was free for you. If you’re a homeowner, this was on average $166 per year, or $14 a month or $3.20 a week (based on median assessed value of $395k).

How Transit Fared in the 2016 Election – Voters in cities and counties around the U.S. decided on nearly $200 billion in transit funding, the most in any single election in the country’s history. Many of the measures were in California, but one Pacific Northwest win was King, Pierce and Snohomish counties who funded by a $54 billion package of increased sales, property and motor vehicle excise taxes, Sound Transit 3, the third phase of Sound Transit’s operations expansion, will add 116 miles of light rail including a second line in Seattle and a “spine” of rail from Everett to the north and Tacoma to the south. It will also increase commuter rail frequency, express bus service and create new bus rapid transit lines. —via NextCity.org

DO: Learn about our Measure 26-173 “Fixing Our Streets” that passed in May.

All Politics is National – How state politicians went from solving the problems in their own backyards to mimicking the gridlock in Washington. –via FiveThirtyEight

DO: Share. Research what happened in local politics this election.

Give Guide – The annual Give!Guide kicked off last week, with a simple look at 141 of Portland’s most impactful nonprofits. Give what you can. As usual, there are some great incentives which makes the whole thing more fun. —via Willamette Week’s Give Guide

DO: Give $10. You’ll get a cool reward through Chinook Book too!

This Week’s Actions: I voted, donated to a local cause through Give!Guide, went to my Traffic and Transportation class at PSU, deactivated my Facebook account, and started this blog.

“Be a practical dreamer, backed by action.”
– Bruce Lee via swissmiss

What are you reading and doing this week?